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R Facelift Cosmetic Surgery Procedure

We call it the R face Lift to differentiate it from the previously described S facelift technique as there is no skin-undermining and deep dissection of tissue, therefore there is no swelling or bruising after the operation.

 
 
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The R Facelift

The R Facelift method was developed in a particular patient who had Ehler’s Danlos Syndrome (EDS). These patients have a tendency of severe bleeding and bruising and poor healing. This technique involves a pre-operative assessment for skin laxity, and the area of skin to be excised is assessed and marked. This technique has a similar scar as in the Minimal Access Cranial Suspension (MACS) facelift, which is around the sideburn, in front of the ear and stops behind the ear. 

Conventional facelift procedures are invasive and need long and complex surgical steps, involve long recovery times and can be disfiguring in the early post-operative period due to severe swelling and bruising. The non-surgical modalities or options for facelift tend to yield a weaker, less noticeable, lift and may require early revision.

Mr Riaz developed the R face and neck lift which is without much skin undermining and no deep or extensive surgical steps and responds to growing demand for long lasting effective facelift procedures associated with minimal down time and lower risk of complications. The resulting scar from R face and neck lift starts around the sideburn and goes in front of the ear and stops two thirds of the length of the posterior surface of the ear in the crease. The only resulting swelling and bruising is close to the suture line for a few days.

The rest of the face and neck does not show any swelling or bruising. There is no risk of collection of blood or haematoma. In technical terms there is a composite lift of face and neck and the effect on the neck is very pronounced. Mr Riaz has been performing R face and neck lift for the last four years with very good and satisfactory outcomes. 


Introduction

Introduction

A face-lift is used to address age-related problems with the lower half of the face, from the eyes and ears downwards. Anything above the eyes is treated with a brow-lift. A face-lift involves elevating and repositioning the skin and soft tissue of the face. During the procedure, cuts are made in front of the ear, extending up and forward along the hairline; redundant skin is then removed, and the remaining skin is hitched and re-draped over its new foundations and sewn into position. Fat and tissue is redistributed and sometimes added to the face.

Face-lifts are generally successful procedures and can have dramatic results, often setting the clock back about ten years. However, patients need to be aware that no face-lift will ever make them look 18 again, and you should be aware of the limitations before you agree to undertake surgery. Brow-lifts, for example, which use the same surgical principles and techniques as craniofacial surgery, allow access to the upper face and have different effects. Face-lifts are commonly performed under general anaesthetic, or with local anaesthetic and sedation.

The operation takes between two to five hours, and patients are likely to need to stay in hospital overnight.

Pain is not a major problem with facial surgery, and complications arising from face-lifts are never usually very serious. However, all patients need to be aware that there is the chance of sustaining damage to the facial nerves.

 

This can cause weakened movement of the eyebrow and lip, although such repercussions are not common and generally improve over several weeks. Following surgery, patients commonly experience:

  • Feelings of tightness when opening mouth
  • Swelling and bruising
  • Feeling low and depressed in the first week
  • Discomfort at night (sleeping upright with ice packs applied to cheeks is recommended)

Stitches can be removed and after ten to fourteen days patients can think about returning to work or going out in public. Within four weeks, you will be feeling more like yourself, albeit a younger looking version. However, patients are advised not to judge the final result of a face-lift for about six to nine months. 

 

WHAT A FACELIFT DOES NOT DO?

A facelift works better for the lower half of the face and particularly the jaw line and neck. If you have sagging eyebrows and wrinkles of the forehead then you should perhaps consider an endoscopic brow lift. Loose skin with fine wrinkles, freckles and rough areas will benefit more by chemical peel or laser resurfacing.

Procedure

Procedure 

This is a modified method developed by Mr Riaz during the last couple of years. This method was developed in a particular patient who had Ehler’s Danlos Syndrome (EDS). These patients have a tendency of severe bleeding and bruising and poor healing. This technique involves a pre-operative assessment for skin laxity, and the area of skin to be excised is assessed and marked. This technique has a similar scar as in the MACS facelift, which is around the sideburn, in front of the ear and stops behind the ear. 

 Intraoperative view of one of the skin excisions

Intraoperative view of one of the skin excisions

There is pre-excision of skin and fat down to SMAS without any undermining of skin. Therefore there is no bruising of the skin of the cheek and neck after this type of facelift. It can be combined with liposuction of fat under the chin and upper part of the neck. Deep sutures are used to plicate the exposed SMAS. The central concept of this technique is called the composite lift. 

The soft tissue of the cheek and neck is lifted in a vertical direction by anchoring the lifting sutures to fixed points above the cheek bone to the temple. This procedure is different to a skin excision only because skin approximation is not dependent on skin closure sutures.

This technique does not require any drains or post-operative pressure dressings. There is a very short down time. The technique itself, as presented in the meeting of British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons in September 2014.

EDS

Ehler’s Danlos Syndrome (EDS)

 Figure 1. (A, E) Preoperative, (B, F) 1 day postoperative, (C, G) 1 year postoperative, and (D, H) 22 month postoperative photographs of this 55-year-old woman.

Figure 1. (A, E) Preoperative, (B, F) 1 day postoperative, (C, G) 1 year postoperative, and (D, H) 22 month postoperative photographs of this 55-year-old woman.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders caused by genetic mutations that result in faulty production of collagen. Multiple body systems can be affected, though the type of EDS depends on which collagen sub-type is involved. There are ten subtypes of EDS. Types 1 and 2 are the classical types and cause hypermobility with moderate skin involvement.

These types are caused by autosomal dominant type V collagen defects. Patients with EDS have fragile skin and tissues that tear easily during operative procedures, which can complicate undermining and suturing strategies. Vessel wall fragility and problems with platelet aggregation can cause excessive bruising and higher risk of hematoma formation in the immediate postoperative period. There can also be increased problems with wound healing, stretched scars, and recurrence of redundant skin folds due to poor collagen synthesis during the proliferative phase after injury.

Facelift and necklift procedures have previously been deemed to have inappropriately high risks of complications in EDS. We present an interesting case to highlight these principles in a patient whose quality of life was severely affected by her preoperative physiognomy.

CASE REPORT

 Figure 2. - This illustration highlights the main areas addressed in the posterior cervicoplasty technique. “U” suture: MACS-like SMAS plication from temporal fascia above zygomatic arch, includes posterior edge of platysma. “O” suture: dermis and subcutaneous tissue, including SMAS to temporal fascia above the zygomatic arch. Third suture: dermis and subcutaneous tissues to temporal fascia above zygomatic arch. Posterior cervicoplasty sutures skin and subcutaneous approximation sutures using 3.0 PDS. Further 3-0 PDS skin approximation sutures from the deep dermal layer to the pre-auricular epichondrium (purple shaded area, skin excision; green shaded area, two small areas skin of undermining to facilitate suture placement).

Figure 2. - This illustration highlights the main areas addressed in the posterior cervicoplasty technique. “U” suture: MACS-like SMAS plication from temporal fascia above zygomatic arch, includes posterior edge of platysma. “O” suture: dermis and subcutaneous tissue, including SMAS to temporal fascia above the zygomatic arch. Third suture: dermis and subcutaneous tissues to temporal fascia above zygomatic arch. Posterior cervicoplasty sutures skin and subcutaneous approximation sutures using 3.0 PDS. Further 3-0 PDS skin approximation sutures from the deep dermal layer to the pre-auricular epichondrium (purple shaded area, skin excision; green shaded area, two small areas skin of undermining to facilitate suture placement).

A 55-year-old woman with EDS (type 2, classical) presented in April 2013 with severe skin laxity of her face and neck, requesting rejuvenation surgery to address her premature facial and cervical ageing in order to restore her self-esteem. She had experienced extensive postoperative bleeding and bruising previously from surgical procedures undertaken on her wrist and knee joints, and had profound awareness of her condition at her initial consultation with the senior author.

At subsequent assessments, spanning over four months, it was mutually agreed that standard face and neck rejuvenation procedures were high risk in her case, but the procedure could be modified with limited tissue excision and conservative tissue handling to titrate the surgical outcomes to her realistic expectations. The patient fully consented, and the risks of significant scaring postoperatively due to her condition were clearly outlined to her. The procedure was performed in August 2013. Her preoperative photographs demonstrate excess skin in the jowls, the upper part of the neck, and the lower part of the neck, which were the patient's main concern (Figure 1).

A MODIFIED RHYTIDECTOMY

The markings were made before the operation in the sitting position. An initial temple to post-earlobe skin marking was made as for a minimal access cranial suspension (MACS) facelift. The patient's skin laxity was assessed, and a second skin marking was made on the cheek and neck (Figures 1E and 2). The patient had general anesthesia, and routine infusion of lignocaine with adrenaline was given. The shaded zone of skin and subcutaneous fat between the two lines was excised down to SMAS without undermining (Figure 3). After meticulous hemostasis, a composite lift of the facial and neck tissues below the inferior border of excision was performed along a vertical vector by using a 2/0 Ethibond “U” suture (Ethicon, LLC, Somerville, NJ).

 Figure 3. - Intraoperative view of one of the skin excisions.

Figure 3. - Intraoperative view of one of the skin excisions.

The “U” suture was from the deep temporal fascia, above the zygomatic arch to a point below the angle of mandible. This requires 1 cm skin undermining inferiorly to take bite of the platysma (Figure 2). This “U” suture is like that of MACS facelift. Multiple bites of SMAS were taken in both directions. This suture was not cut short at this stage and the same loop of 2/0 ethibond was used to complete the middle “O” suture. This elevated the neck and created the angle between the chin and neck. This suture mainly restores the skin tightness of the upper and middle neck and improves the definition of the cervicomental angle.

A third suture of MACS facelift type was placed before the middle “O” suture. This requires 2 cm undermining of the superior margin of the wound to expose the temporal fascia (Figure 2). The dermis and subcutaneous tissue of the inferior skin edge to the temporal fascia was secured using 2/0 ethibond. This provides elevation of the cheek soft tissues to improve the support of the lower eyelid.

The remaining loop of “U” suture was used as an “O” suture to elevate the central part of cheek and was secured to the temporal fascia. This suture improves the nasolabial fold to jowl area of the face, including elevation of the angle of the mouth, by securing the dermis and subcutaneous tissue of the distal skin flap to the temporal fascia above the zygomatic arch.

Further, a 3/0 PDS suture was used to approximate wound margins and to elevate, at the same time fixing the tissue to Lore's ligament anterior the neck and jowl, to the tragus, which is a fixed point. At this stage, both wound margins of the skin excision become almost approximated. Skin and subcutaneous tissues were sutured with absorbable sutures. This two layer suturing prevents any tension over the wound edges, with the aim of preventing scar widening.

 

TECHNIQUE FOR POSTERIOR CERVICOPLASTY

The skin excision was undertaken as marked (Figure 2) and 3/0 PDS sutures were employed to approximate the borders of the excision, thereby elevating the ptotic lateral and inferior neck, and improving the cervicomental angle. Double layered closure wass employed for the skin and subcutaneous tissue approximation using absorbable sutures and again, no undermining of skin flaps was performed (Figures 2 and 3).

Steri-Strips (3M, St. Paul, MN) were applied to the wound and gauze, wool, and crepe bandages were used as a head bandage for gentle compression overnight.


RESULTS

POSTOPERATIVE COURSE

 Download the full EDS case report

Download the full EDS case report

The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery. There was no bruising on the face and neck. However, she did have severe bruising at the IV cannulation line site. Figure 1 demonstrates the patient at 1 day, 1 year, and 22 months postoperatively. Note the minimal bruising on day 1 postoperatively (Figure 1B,F). At follow-up, she was noted to have uncomplicated wound healing and after more than one year, the scars had settled well. The patient was delighted with the surgical outcome and stated this in a letter to the leading surgeon involved in this case.

The long-term follow-up photographs also demonstrate that without the use of an “anchor” stitch to a fixed point, there can be direct tension on the skin edge. In patients with connective tissues this can cause scar widening.

DISCUSSION

We compare this case to another reported in 1985.3 The patient described was a 62-year-old woman with EDS. In that case a standard face and necklift was performed, but there were severe operative difficulties as routine steps could not be executed. The patient had a stormy postoperative period with severe bruising and multiple returns to theatre for evacuation of hematomas.

Guerrerosantos and Dicksheet demonstrated postoperative complications at day 3 in a female patient with EDS syndrome (the particular type of EDS was not documented). Severe ecchymosis was noted. An extensive review of the literature involving rhytidectomy within EDS patients was conducted, and only the one case reported above was found. Patients with EDS requesting rhytidectomy procedures represent a challenge to plastic surgeons which has previously been considered insurmountable.3 We have adapted standard facelift techniques to reduce invasiveness with this new technique for this high risk patient cohort. This will avoid the policy which is generally employed by plastic surgeons when confronted with a request for a rhytidectomy by patients with EDS.

We feel that whilst our patient did not have the most severe form of EDS, she did in fact have a connective tissue disease that put her at a significantly increased risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications directly effecting her rhytidectomy. Despite this, our modified technique demonstrates the success of no undermining and the possibility of cosmetic and corrective surgery for this cohort of patient, without the complications.

CONCLUSION

This limited composite facelift technique is a modified MACS procedure with no undermining. Despite this conservative approach, this technique uses deep lifting sutures of the MACS lift technique, elevating tissues along a vertical vector producing a more natural looking stable result at 1 year follow-up. This has encouraged us to offer the technique to many of our routine primary and secondary facelift patients. We now routinely perform this technique as a day case procedure under local anesthesia with sedation.

DISCLOSURES

The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and publication of this article.

FUNDING

The authors received no financial support for the research, authorship, and publication of this article.

© 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

REFERENCES

    1    ↵De Paepe A, Malfait F. Bleeding and bruising in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and other collagen vascular disorders. Br J Haematol. 2004;1275:491-500.CrossRefMedlineWeb of Science
    1    ↵De Paepe A, Malfait F. The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a disorder with many faces. Clin Genet. 2012;821:1-11.CrossRefMedline
    1    ↵Guerrerosantos J, Dicksheet S. Cervicofacial rhytidoplasty in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: hazards on healing. Plast Reconstr Surg. 1985;751:100-103.CrossRefMedline

 

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R Facelift Cosmetic Surgery Testimonials

I am proud of the work my team and I provide and am always willing to share the testimonials from my patients, here are just a few.

 
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R Facelift Consultations & Clinic Info

Live outside Hull & East Yorkshire? Here's some useful information if you need to travel and stay over as part of your R Facelift cosmetic surgery procedure.

Mr Riaz's patient support team will arrange with you which of the three main (Hull, Grimsby & Doncaster) clinics your consultation and cosmetic surgery procedure will take place. We have detailed below useful information for each of the locations, which will assist you during your cosmetic surgery journey.

Mr Riaz's Patient Support team can be contacted during office hours on 01482 841228 & 01482 841229.


Spire Hospital

Lowfield Road
Anlaby
Hull & East Riding
HU10 7AZ
01482 841228

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About Spire Hospital
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St Hugh's Hospital

St Hugh's Hospital
Peaks Lane
Grimsby
DN32 9RP
01472 898725

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Park Hill Hospital

Thorne Road
Doncaster
South Yorkshire
DN2 5TH
01302 553355

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Meet Your Surgeon

 Mr Muhammad Riaz, Consultant Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeon

Mr Muhammad Riaz  - FRCSI, FRCS(GLASG), FRCSED, FRCS(PLAST)

CONSULTANT PLASTIC, RECONSTRUCTIVE AND AESTHETIC SURGEON

I have worked as a Consultant Plastic, Cosmetic and Reconstructive Surgeon since 1999 and currently work in the UK at The Department of Plastic Surgery, Castle Hill Hospital, Cottingham, in East Yorkshire.  I received an honorary appointment to the Academic Staff of the Hull York Medical School (HYMS).  My role is one of Senior Clinical Tutor and involves teaching, research and curriculum development. 

Myself, my anaesthetic, medical and patient support teams look forward to meeting you in person.

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Cosmetic Surgery Guides & Information

Patient information leaflets and resources about facelift procedures are provided by the relevant professional body.

 

Use this information in conjunction with advice from Mr Riaz or other health care professionals looking after you.

Cosmetic Surgery - Professional Bodies

DO YOU KNOW YOUR SURGEON WELL ENOUGH TO MAKE AN INFORMED DECISION?

You should ask yourself a number of questions before embarking on any treatment, most important of all is, how do you know if he has undertaken the appropriate and relevant training?

In short – Plastic, Cosmetic and Aesthetic Surgeons in the UK cannot describe themselves as such unless they are recorded on the General Medical Council Specialist Register. Surgeons can only qualify for entry onto this register after they have undertaken and completed accredited training in plastic surgery over a number of years, which is recognised by the GMC.

Mr Riaz is registered and an active member of all of the above professional bodies, is your surgeon?

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